Projects of Shingala Azad

Our the biggest successful projects:

Currently Ongoing Projects in 2021

Donor: Lea Foundation

Implementation period: July 1st to October 30th. 2021Humanitarian Project “Provision of water filters for some households in the village of Daka-Mazn”.
Daka-Mazn village is located in Duhok Governorate, about 30 minutes from Mosul. The village is inhabited by Kurds who recognize the Yazid religion. Currently there are 75 families (375  individuals), a very large population is from socially vulnerable groups, both due to previous long-term war conflicts and due to many restrictive restrictions imposed by the government in early 2020 to prevent the spread of coronavirus covid -19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Nowadays, many people in Iraq have lost their jobs and civil servants have not been paid regularly due to the economic crisis.
As part of the project, we will provide 20 families approximately (117 individuals), socially disadvantaged families with household filters that will provide them with treated safe drinking water from purified well. This will alleviate their difficult life and financial situation. From now  on, for the money saved, which they currently have to spend on bottled water, they will be able to use it for other necessary living costs.

Donor: financed by official development assistance of the Slovak Republic, SlovakAid

Partners: Caritas Slovakia, Shingala Azad NGO, and Slovak Bishops’ Conference

Implementation period: October 1st. 2021 to September 30th. 2022

Summary:

The humanitarian project “Provision of Drinking Water for Bersava and Birstek villages” in Iraq aims at providing sufficient drinking water for the needs of local people and IDP communities that arrived in the villages in August 2014 due to the armed conflict unleashed by Da ‘ash Islamists.

The project aims to build wells and provide the necessary material and technological equipment (diesel generator, submersible pump, piping and brick shelter) that will supply sufficient water to the municipal water supply, which will be available to local residents with a total population of approximately 6860 inhabitants.

Support for water infrastructure is a key factor in the further development of both villages. Sufficient drinking water eliminates the risk of tension between the home and the internally displaced people (IDPs), raises the living standards of the population by saving money that they would otherwise have to spend on drinking water, and improves the growing and breeding activities of local communities. This is all economic situation.

Iraq is currently in the post-conflict phase of rebuilding basic infrastructure, and the local government is unable to fund the simplification of drinking water availability for residents of villages outside the largest cities in the region. Lack of drinking water therefore forces locals to buy drinking water from either plastic containers or mobile tanks. As the summer air temperature in this area reaches 50 ° C, easy access to drinking water is essential not only for disease prevention but also for hydration.

The project will also include training (awareness lectures) by our experienced lecturers on the protection of water resources and preventive measures against Covid-19, on cultivation and breeding activities and prevention against Covid-19.

The village of Srechka

The village of Shrechka also written as Sirechka, Srejka. There is a large Yazidi community in the village. The village is located in northern Iraq in the province of Nineveh. The lack of drinking water and service water is a big problem in Iraq. There are three wells in the village of Srechka, two wells date from 1977, which are in poor operating condition, the technical equipment is already obsolete.

In 2014, another well was built in the village, which is connected to the same water tank as the existing two wells. A big problem is the operation of wells – pumping water. Wells work only when the public electricity network is in operation, and that is only 10-12 hours a day. Securing a regular supply of electricity is another challenge in Iraq.

In 2014, when terrorist militias and divisions of the so-called Islamic State began to invade Iraq, the population increased by internally displaced persons from the Nineveh Plain and the Sinjar region to up to 90 families, mostly Yazidis.

The existing and newly built wells still do not provide a sufficient amount of water, which is currently sufficient for less than 50% of the 6,000 inhabitants of the village. Due to the long-term military conflict, the unstable security situation, the regional self-government and the municipality do not have the financial resources for projects (search) and the construction of other vital wells.

The village of Avzareky

Avzeryke is an Armenian Christian community that was founded in 1932, when Armenians fled the Turks, a time of genocide against the Armenian population. At the end of 1961, the village was displaced and occupied by the Arab population, who lived here until 1990/1991. At present, about 67 Armenian families live in the village again.

The life of the inhabitants of the village depends mainly on agriculture and livestock breeding. Many residents work or look for work in the surrounding towns. The village has a problem with supplying locals with drinking water. The water that locals have to use is often very polluted, and there are no other sources to depend on. The water which is being used contains substances that are not suitable for drinking, when using this water it leads to health complications, especially for children, adolescents and seniors. The usage of this water can cause permanent damage to people’s health.

The aim and object of the project is the implementation of water filters for households. Although some families living over there already have such filters, the vast majority of families, especially the socially disadvantaged and incomplete, do not have the financial means to purchase or install these filters.

Donor: funded by Official Development Assistance of the Slovak Republic, SlovakAid

Partners: Caritas Slovakia, Shingala Azad NGO, Slovak Bishop’s Conference

Implementation period: 1st October – 30th September 2021

Summary:

Humanitarian Project ” Provision of drinking water for the municipalities of Shekhka and Hasan Ava” in Iraq aims to provide sufficient drinking water to meet the needs of local residents as well as IDP communities that arrived in municipalities in August 2014 due to armed conflict unleashed by Da’esh Islamists .

The project is aimed at building wells and providing the necessary material and technological equipment (diesel generator, submersible pump, piping and protective brick shelter), which will supply sufficient water to the municipal water supply system, which will be available to local communities with a total of approximately 6,500 residents.

Support for water infrastructure is a key factor in the further development of both municipalities. Sufficient drinking water eliminates the risk of tensions between the home and IDP community, raises the standard of living of the population by saving their money that they would otherwise have to spend on the purchase of drinking water and improves the conditions for the cultivation and breeding activities of local communities and thus contributes to their better economic situation.   

Iraq is currently in a post-conflict phase of restoring basic infrastructure, and the local government is unable to finance the simplification of drinking water availability for residents of municipalities outside the region’s largest cities. Thus, the lack of drinking water forces local residents to buy drinking water in plastic containers or mobile tanks. As summer air temperatures reach 50 ° C in this region, easy access to drinking water is essential not only for disease prevention, but also for hydration.

The project will also include training focused on the protection of water resources, cultivation activities and for teachers and students of the second grade of primary school training on the importance of hygiene and drinking regime.

Successful projects in 2020 - Shingala Azad

There are still many displaced people in Iraqi Kurdistan, in IDP camps and unfinished buildings. Since 2014, these individuals and entire families have been living both in refugee camps and outside them. Many of them depend on humanitarian support, due to the constant war conflicts on their territory, but very often of these people are without any help.

At present, in addition to the issue of housing and the provision of basic human needs, displaced persons are facing a new problem, a global pandemic – the Covid-19 infection. In this tough condition, there is a need for cohesion and mutual assistance, it has never been more important than it is now.

Thanks to the financial support of SlovakAid, we were able and can provide displaced residents with basic information on how to defend against the Covod-19 infection, and how to observe hygienic conditions. Other parts of the support are packages that contain antibacterial and hygiene needs, and basic food packages for displaced people.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank our esteemed partner of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic – Slovakaid for financing and supporting the project.

The village of Srechka

The village of Shrechka also written as Sirechka, Srejka. There is a large Yazidi community in the village. The village is located in northern Iraq in the province of Nineveh. The lack of drinking water and service water is a big problem in Iraq. There are three wells in the village of Srechka, two wells date from 1977, which are in poor operating condition, the technical equipment is already obsolete.

In 2014, another well was built in the village, which is connected to the same water tank as the existing two wells. A big problem is the operation of wells – pumping water. Wells work only when the public electricity network is in operation, and that is only 10-12 hours a day. Securing a regular supply of electricity is another challenge in Iraq.

In 2014, when terrorist militias and divisions of the so-called Islamic State began to invade Iraq, the population increased by internally displaced persons from the Nineveh Plain and the Sinjar region to up to 90 families, mostly Yazidis.

The existing and newly built wells still do not provide a sufficient amount of water, which is currently sufficient for less than 50% of the 6,000 inhabitants of the village. Due to the long-term military conflict, the unstable security situation, the regional self-government and the municipality do not have the financial resources for projects (search) and the construction of other vital wells.

The village of Avzareky

Avzeryke is an Armenian Christian community that was founded in 1932, when Armenians fled the Turks, a time of genocide against the Armenian population. At the end of 1961, the village was displaced and occupied by the Arab population, who lived here until 1990/1991. At present, about 67 Armenian families live in the village again.

The life of the inhabitants of the village depends mainly on agriculture and livestock breeding. Many residents work or look for work in the surrounding towns. The village has a problem with supplying locals with drinking water. The water that locals have to use is often very polluted, and there are no other sources to depend on. The water which is being used contains substances that are not suitable for drinking, when using this water it leads to health complications, especially for children, adolescents and seniors. The usage of this water can cause permanent damage to people’s health.

The aim and object of the project is the implementation of water filters for households. Although some families living over there already have such filters, the vast majority of families, especially the socially disadvantaged and incomplete, do not have the financial means to purchase or install these filters.

Donor: funded by Official Development Assistance of the Slovak Republic, SlovakAid

Partners: Caritas Slovakia, Shingala Azad NGO, Slovak Bishop’s Conference

Implementation period: 1st October – 30th September 2021

Summary:

Humanitarian Project ” Provision of drinking water for the municipalities of Shekhka and Hasan Ava” in Iraq aims to provide sufficient drinking water to meet the needs of local residents as well as IDP communities that arrived in municipalities in August 2014 due to armed conflict unleashed by Da’esh Islamists .

The project is aimed at building wells and providing the necessary material and technological equipment (diesel generator, submersible pump, piping and protective brick shelter), which will supply sufficient water to the municipal water supply system, which will be available to local communities with a total of approximately 6,500 residents.

Support for water infrastructure is a key factor in the further development of both municipalities. Sufficient drinking water eliminates the risk of tensions between the home and IDP community, raises the standard of living of the population by saving their money that they would otherwise have to spend on the purchase of drinking water and improves the conditions for the cultivation and breeding activities of local communities and thus contributes to their better economic situation.   

Iraq is currently in a post-conflict phase of restoring basic infrastructure, and the local government is unable to finance the simplification of drinking water availability for residents of municipalities outside the region’s largest cities. Thus, the lack of drinking water forces local residents to buy drinking water in plastic containers or mobile tanks. As summer air temperatures reach 50 ° C in this region, easy access to drinking water is essential not only for disease prevention, but also for hydration.

The project will also include training focused on the protection of water resources, cultivation activities and for teachers and students of the second grade of primary school training on the importance of hygiene and drinking regime.

The project of “Providing drinking water for the inhabitants of the villages of Ba’ashiqah and Bahzani” was successfully completed and handed over to the administration of the administrative authorities of the Republic of Iraq.

According to the project, three wells with pipes and water reservoirs were built, which serve for the inhabitants of the villages of Ba’ashiqah and Bahzan as new sources of potable water and at the same time as sources of agricultural development, which is important for the local community and the area. The water will be beneficial and will be used to irrigate existing olive groves over there, to expand olive groves and to grow crops to ensure food self-sufficiency and employment opportunities.

There were also professional seminars:

1. On the protection of water resources,

2. On cultivation activities focusing on olives and other agricultural crops.

Another important part of the professional seminars was the prevention of how to defend against the COVID-19 infection and what to follow hygienic habits.

We thank our partners, Slovak Catholic Charity and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic – Slovakaid, for the approach and financing of the project.

The project “Provision of potable water for the residents of the villages of Bashika and Bahzani” is a response to the situation which occurred as a result of an armed conflict caused by the terror of Islamic commandos and their trying to establish a self-constituted Islamic State (Daesh) on the conquered territory in the parts of the states of Iraq and Syria. This territory was pronounced a caliphate, which claims to have a religious authority over all Muslims in the world and strives to rule all territories where Muslims live.
In June 2014, the villages were gradually occupied by the commandos of the so-called Islamic State, the territory in the North of Iraq, which is mainly inhabited by the Yazidis, who created and ethnic and religious community, whose members are mainly the Kurds from the North of Iraq. It was this community together with Christians that became the target of the terror of the Islamic militia. In spite of all their effort to flee from the occupied area to Iraqi Kurdistan, there were many Yazidis who did not manage to run away in time and they were murdered or enslaved.
Municipalities of Bahzani and Bashika are villages that lie in the district of Al-Hamdaniya in the Nineveh Province in Northern Iraq and were occupied by Islamic commandos on 6 August 2014. Those who survived lived in refugee camps near the city of Duhok or the city of Erbil till the area was liberated. The villages stayed under the dominion of the Islamic State almost to the end of 2016.
The occupied area of Northern Iraq was gradually liberated from November 2016 during the battle of Mosul by Peshmerga army, which later liberated also the villages of Bahzani and Bashika. In October 2017, the area was seized by Hasdi Al Shabi group (National mobilisation forces of mainly Shi’ite militia were set up by the Iraqi Republic to fight against the Islamic State), which has been there to this day.
The villages of Bahzani and Bashika are now under the administration of Iraqi government from Baghdad, the capital city. Both villages are close to each other and are rightly regarded as one village. Big parts of the villages were destroyed during the Islamic State occupation, as were schools, medical facilities, bureaus, water infrastructure (water supply), water sources were contaminated. Many people from both villages were murdered, survivors suffer from traumas, many children lost their parents, many women did not manage to break free. Currently, there are 5,000 families (about 30,000 people) living in both villages, most of them gradually returned. It is important to ensure potable water for the families, so that they can stay here.
The project for the provision of potable water is very important for the villages and should help the families that returned and want to settle there. The project aims to build three new water sources (drilled wells), including a hydrogeological survey, drilling the wells, installation of pumps in the wells, construction of protective kiosks, delivery and connection of electricity generators, piping, delivery and installation of reservoirs, connection of the wells to the mains in the villages. The project includes lessons on water source protection, the importance of personal hygiene and drinking regime, use in agriculture.
We would like to thank our partners, the Slovak Catholic Charity and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Slovak Republic – Slovakaid for funding and support of the project.

We successfully completed the expansion and operation projects of the Sinjar and Sharfadeen Clinics in Iraq together with our partners. In 2020, it was possible to ensure accessibility for the general public in the newly built specialized gynecology and dentistry surgeries in Sinjar, Iraq. The professional operation of the Sharfadeen Clinic will be further ensured through Dr. Shamo, the head of the clinic.

From the beginning, the aim of the project was to increase the availability of basic medical care in the town of Sinjar, which is home to approximately 6,000 families. Another goal of the ongoing project was to ensure continuity of medical care in the already operated clinic in the area of Sharfadeen shrine suroundings, where approximately 1,000 families currently live in its vicinity, all the set goals of the projects have been successfully met.

On November 1, 2020, the clinic in the town of Sinjar was officially handed over to the administration of the Ministry of Health in Iraq. We would like to thank all the partners involved in this project and made this possible, namely Mr. Michal Svoboda, Czech Consul General, Mr. Ali Omar, governor’s assistant for Organizations and Displaced Affairs, Mr. Oldřich Haičman, Executive Director of the Diocesan Charity Brno, Mr. Filip Habrman, Deputy for charity Brno, Dr. Jamal, director of the primary health care section in Sinjar district.

We thank the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic and the Diocesan Charity Brno for significant financing of the project.

Since 2019, we, together with Diocesan Charity Brno and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic, have been providing basic medical care in the Nineveh Province in Sinjar area at two medical clinics.

After the liberation of cities from the occupation of the so-called Islamic State, one of the main targets was to renew medical care for local residents, who began to return home. In October 2019, we opened our second clinic in the area and we can provide people who have already returned and those who keep returning from refugee camps with the care of a general practitioner, a paediatrician and a surgeon and we are preparing an extension and access to medical care by gynaecology and stomatology.

The operation of the clinic was inaugurated in October 2019, the clinic provides basic medical care for children and adults, minor surgeries and laboratory tests. Staff working at the clinic include a doctor, a nurse, a laboratory technician, a cleaner and a guard. The doctor at the clinic in Sinjar provides care for about 50 to 60 patients a day. All patients are entered into records, have their own medical cards, where the nurse records their visits, test results and any future visits to the doctor.
The clinic in the municipality of Sherfadin has been operating since May 2017. The clinic provides primary medical care for children and adults including minor surgeries for the residents of Sherfadin and its surroundings. Staff working at the clinic include a doctor, a nurse, a cleaner. They treat about 35 to 45 patients a day at the clinic in Sherfadin. All patients are entered into records, have their own medical cards and the nurses record all patient visits

The dental clinic was opened on Friday, May 29, 2020. The operating hours have so far been set for Monday and Tuesday (twice a week for 8 hours a day, ie 16 hours a week).

The gynecological outpatient clinic was opened on Friday, September 4, 2020. Here, a similar working time was proposed for the initial operation of the outpatient clinic with a dental clinic on Friday and Saturday (twice a week for 8 hours a day, ie 16 hours a week).

In the case of the gynecological outpatient clinic, it is the first medical facility of its kind in the town of Sinjar and the surrounding area, which is equipped with high-level medical equipment and high-quality professional medical staff.

Both of these clinics were successfully completed and handed over on November 1, 2020 under the administration of the Ministry of Health in Iraq. We thank the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic and the Diocesan Charity Brno for their help both in the actual implementation and in the financing of these projects.

Beginning May 2020, we are going to continue with our project to expand the operation of the clinic in the city of Sinjar on the premises of the existing clinic by a new dental surgery, equipped by new medical devices and tools for doctors. The operation of the clinic will be secured by a contractual relationship with the doctor. We will also start providing specialized medical care in the field of gynaecology and obstetrics with a perinatal clinic for the residents of the city and its close surroundings.

We would like to thank our partners, Diocesan Charity Brno and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic for funding and support of the project.

The constructed bakery provides access to the basic food – bread – in the city of Sinjar and job opportunities to women ransomed from the captivity of the so-called Islamic State. We helped the women and girls ransomed from the slavery of the so-called Islamic State by building a bakery, which gave them jobs and financial independence, social usefulness and the very necessary therapy. We opened the bakery on 18 October 2019.

We would like to thank our partners, Diocesan Charity Brno and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic for funding and support of the project.

Successful projects in 2019 - Shingala Azad

Medical clinics in the city of Sinjar and Sherfadin operate in the Sinjar region, which is a part of Nineveh Governorate. Before the invasion and occupation by Islamic forces of self-appointed Islamic State, the area was almost exclusively populated by Yazidis, who are an ethnic-religious community and its members are mainly Kurds.

It was this group of inhabitants that became a target of terror of military groups of Islamic State, if they did not manage to escape to the mountains or to an area controlled by Peshmerga, the Kurdish military forces. Men who did not escape or who were captured were tortured and then shot. Women and girls became wives of Islamists or sexual slaves, children were brought up as future suicide warriors. Sinjar and the neighbouring villages were almost destroyed in the fights and nobody wanted to come back.

Our project aims to help the original inhabitants decide to return from refugee camps. The project to build a medical clinic aims to ensure available elementary medical care to people who returned back to Sinjar, where currently about 6,000 families live. Access to medical care is very limited because the city has been damaged but also because the area was closed by military forces after a referendum of the autonomous regional government of Kurdistan (KRG) in 2017 about the independence from the government in Baghdad.

Our organization together with our partners strive to ensure temporary medical care for women, men and children in the area, who often suffer from hypothermia, contaminated water, infections, insufficient hygiene and psychical traumas and anxiety. The aim of the project is not only to build a clinic, but ensure doctors, nurses and auxiliary personnel and funds to operate the clinics. Another aim is to expand medical care and prepare more specialized units.

The medical clinic built and operated in Sherfadin within our project provides medical care for about 1,000 families. We managed to get medical personnel directly from the region and it includes two doctors, two nurses, one laboratory technician, auxiliary personnel of one guard and one cleaner.

Both clinics provide primary medical care for adults (men and women) and children, including minor surgeries, laboratory testing for the inhabitants of Sinjar and its close surroundings and in Sherfadin and its surroundings. Our clinic in Sinjar treats 30 to 40 patients daily and the clinic in Sherfadin 40 to 50 patients daily. The number of patients is limited due to capacity reasons of the clinics, and the number of doctors and other medical staff.

The bakery built in Sinjar helps to provide access for a great number of locals to the basic local food – bread for a lower price. The bakery created jobs especially for women and also helped them to integrate into the community again as the majority of these women were held captive by the so-called Islamic State.
The project ensured construction and equipment of the bakery. The profit from the sales of bread serves as wages for two bakers employed there and one person managing the building who also keeps records of material.

Funding and realization of the project:
The project was funded by Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the help of Diocesan Charity Brno in the amount of 500,000 CZK. Total project financial costs: 4,994,200 CZK

The city of Bozan faced serious water shortages repeatedly in the past. Before the war conflict, about 2,000 families (8,000 to 9,000 people) lived there permanently. The number of families and people in the city increased significantly by about 400 families (1,600 to 2,000 people) of evacuated inhabitants who came from Shingal/Sinjar region after the attack of the so-called Islamic State in 2014. The current situation regarding potable water for the city and its inhabitants is even more complicated.

Potable water sources (three wells) were built in 1980 and in the past provided water for about half the current population. The capacity of these sources was insufficient, water quality was bad and the operation was not provided for properly because of power cuts. Electricity for the pumps was supplied from the distribution network, to which electricity supply was ensured by state administration. The wells only operated for six to nine hours a day.

The aim of the project was to provide more potable water sources, modernize one of the current sources (well) and ensure that water from the new sources can be drawn all day independently of electricity supply from the state network.

We built three new wells in Bozan and completely renovated one of the original ones. We had to drill to 220 metres to get water. All new wells include protective kiosks. Each well has a power supply, which ensures pumping of water from the well into the existing water main in the city.

Funding and realization of the project:
The project was funded by Slovak Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (SlovakAid) and co-funded by Slovak Catholic Charity
Total financial costs: 210,000.00 EUR

The bakery was built in the city of Khanike, where about 4,500 local families live, with the support of Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Slovak Catholic Charity. Close to the city, there is also a refugee and evacuee camp of the same name, where about 2,900 families (about 14,500 people) are crowded. Apart from this camp, there are also evacuated families from the region of Shingal/Sinjar living in tents or unfinished buildings, and there are about 3,000 (12,500 to 15,000 people) of them.

The built bakery helps especially people who returned from the captivity of the so-called Islamic State and still live in Khanike refugee camp – at any given time it is about 46 families, i.e. about 230 people. In the refugee camp (IDP camp), there are still about 50 families (about 250 people) living there, about 30 orphans, part of them with their close relatives. We provide help to these people together with governmental resources. The project helps between 650 to 675 people in total.

The project is important because it provides these people with basic food – bread and includes local people into the project, creates jobs for them and helps them return to the evacuated places.

In 2019, the bakery operated with the support of Slovak Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (SlovakAid) and humanitarian organization Roja Sor CZ 1, z.s. Together, in 2019 we aimed to support the operation of the bakery and extend our food help to the refugee camp, where many orphans and people who were captured by the so-called Islamic State live.

Funding and realization of the project:
The project was funded by Slovak Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (SlovakAid)
Total financial costs of the project: 9,916.40 EUR
Additional funding of the project: Roja Sor CZ 1,z.s. 20,000 CZK.

The municipality of Babire is one of the five villages in a compound that was built in 1985 when Mosul Dam was built, during which most of the original villages were flooded by the water of the dam. Before the attack of the so-called Islamic State (ISIS) in 2014, about 8,000 people lived in the compound. Most of them were labourers. After the compound was occupied, the whole population fled to the region of Iraqi Kurdistan (RIK).

After the liberation of the area from the Islamic State, people started to return to their homes. In 2016, 142 students from local families including students evacuated from other parts of Iraq (Sinjar, etc.) started to attend school. Due to insufficient capacity of the classrooms, they had to study in two shifts. The number of students keeps increasing, not only from local people, but also Syrian students. Currently, there are 170 students, who only study in five classrooms in the renovated old school.

The main aim of the project is to provide a place for the education of children and teenagers, who we think will stay in the region, which will become their future home. The project used the existing school building and part of its interior equipment and furnishing. The project enabled children to return to school, provided them access to education, easier and more comfortable learning and future inclusion into the society.

Funding and realization of the project:
The project was funded by the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Total financial costs of the project: 459,759.67 CZK

Successful projects in 2018 - Shingala Azad

In 2017, the non-profit organization Shingala Azad together with the funding from Ministry of Foreign
Affairs of the Czech Republic and Archbishopric of Olomouc carried out “Paediatric clinic” project in the
city of Sherfadin. The aim of the organization in partnership with Diocesan Charity in Brno in 2018 was to
provide and further improve medical care for local people in Sherfadin and close by. From February to
December 2018, we ensured better supplies of pharmaceuticals, medical material and equipment of the
clinic, kept jobs and funding of local doctors and a nurse.
Nowadays, the Sherfadin clinic is open to public five days a week. More units have been added to the
clinic. Today, the clinic includes stable and fully equipped general, paediatric and gynaecological units,
and regularly pays the nurses and doctors’ salaries and transport costs and operating costs of the clinic.
Project funding: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic 1,999,027.00 CZK
Realization partner: Diocesan Charity Brno, contributed 10,983 EUR and 16,993 EUR

There are about 4,500 people living in the municipality of Khanik. There is a refugee camp of the same
name located next to it, where 2,900 families live. Apart from this main refugee camp, there are 3,000
evacuated (fugitive) inhabitants living near the Shingal (Sinjar) area, who often live only in tents or
houses that have been damaged by war or not finished.
The land for the construction of the bakery was given to Shingala Azad by BCF organization. The bakery
built in Khanike caters every day for people (families) returning from the captivity of the so-called Islamic
State, people who still live in Khanike refugee camp and locals in difficult social and financial
circumstances, and provides them with the elementary food help – Kurdish bread. Another purpose of
our project was to create new job opportunities for local people.
Thanks to this help and contribution, we can and continue to provide help for 650 to 675 people, who live
under the poverty threshold and only depend on help from similar humanitarian projects. However, such
projects that aim to change the current situation are necessary for the return of more people, stabilization
of local conditions and support of local self-administration and governmental bodies. We were able to run
the clinic in 2018 thanks to the help of humanitarian organization Roja Sor CZ 1, z.s.
Project funding: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic 500,000 CZK.
Realization partner: Slovak Catholic Charity 4,000 EU.
Funding of the project operation: Roja Sor CZ 1,z.s. contributed to the operation by 60,000 CZK.

Although it has been three years since the Sinjar Region was attacked by the forces of the so-called
Islamic State and nearly two years since the liberation of the city itself, the return rate of original
inhabitants and other refugees to the damaged city remains slow and people worry about the
condition of their houses, worry about how the temporary housing, food and healthcare will be
provided. Gradually, over 1,000 families have returned to the city. However, in refugee camps in the
mountains still live over 10,000 who have a place to return to. The city of Shingal (Sinjar), which had been ruled by the Islamic State (ISIS) for a long time, was largely destroyed during its liberation by Kurdish Peshmerga forces. Not only buildings and civil engineering networks (water main, sewer system) were destroyed or damaged, but also sources of potable water, which were often mined or contaminated by toxic substances. This was the way for
ISIS to prevent locals from returning and damage this region of Iraqi Kurdistan. As a result, the region
has faced a shortage in potable water supply and uncontaminated water sources for nearly two years.
One of the priorities of our organization when helping with the return of people to the area was to ensure new sources of potable water and renew the distribution networks for the locals. Water sources are drilled wells over 200 meters deep. At the opening of the well is a protective kiosk connected to an electricity generator. There are new water pipes from the well to a water reservoir (tank), which will be connected to the existing city water mains.

Funding and realization of the project:
The project was funded by Episcopal Conference of Slovakia and Slovak Catholic Charity.
The funds for the realization of the project amounted to 44,300.00 EUR.

The municipality of Fayshkhabour has faced a big problem with shortage of both potable water and service water for many years. The situation became unsustainable for the local people. The only available well, which also supplied people from other villages, was in the city of Derebune, 7 kilometres away. However, this source itself was not sufficient to meet the needs of local people. Subsequent analysis of the water showed that the source was contaminated and the water only had the quality of service water. The water was the source of health problems of many adults and children who used this water for drinking because they did not have any other sources. This well with a reservoir (water tank) has been a water source since 1979 and it was presumably contaminated during the war conflict with the so-called Islamic State. Kurdistan still faces prolonged economical and political crisis of the whole Iraqi Republic. In this unstable situation, it is very difficult to ask state bodies in the capital Baghdad for funds for project providing for elementary human needs –food and potable water.

Our organization has repeatedly tried to point out the situation but without great success, only with a promise for a possible change although we feel that access to potable (uncontaminated) water is crucial for the return of more people from refugee camps and rebuilding of villages. It was vital to find a solution as soon as possible because the ambient temperatures in the region reach over 50°C from May to the end of October. Access to potable water is crucial for the region; lack of source and water quality assurance meant a risk of disease spreading as a result of dehydration and insufficient personal hygiene, which would mean an epidemic due to lack of medical care. On the basis of financial help from abroad from the Episcopal Conference of Slovakia and Slovak Catholic Charity, we made two successful drills 203 metres deep following a survey to gain new water sources. At the opening of both wells, there are protective kiosks and they are connected to an electricity generator. There are water pipes from the wells to the water tanks, which are connected to the existing water mains in the village.
Project funding:
Episcopal Conference of Slovakia and Slovak Catholic Charity
The amount for project realization was 81,040.00 EUR.

Successful projects in 2017 - Shingala Azad

A sponsor from Iraqi Kurdistan donated us an amount for the purchase of school articles for the children from the refugee camp in Sherfadin. We bought 100 school bags, pencil cases, exercise books and writing tools.

In cooperation with the Slovak organization STEP-IN, we supplied the municipalities of Sherfadin and Usefa and the refugee camps Sherfadin 1 and 2 with baby milk to the mothers who were unable to breastfeed due to mental problems for the period of 3 months.

Along with the Czech organization Roja Sor CZ 1,z.s., we conducted the project named Parcels to which people of the Czech Republic contributed. This aid was distributed to the Sherfadin 1 and 2 refugee camps: this contained 160 sanitary parcels for adults, 30 sanitary parcels for babies, 70 parcels of joy and approximately 100 kg of clothes and toys.

Every illness in the Sinjar area is a big problem, even a common cold could turn into a life-threatening state in these conditions. That is why we decided to build a Paediatric Surgery. The land was given to us by the representatives of the Sherfadin municipality. We received the financial funds from the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs and from the Archbishopric of Olomouc, CR. The surgery will serve the local inhabitants and the residents of the refugee camps Sherfadin 1 and 2.

In cooperation and with the financial support of the Slovak Catholic Charity and the Conference of Bishops in Slovakia, we managed to conduct the Sherfadin Wells project.. this project concerns two wells, a protective structure and power generators in municipality of Sherfadin and Usefa. Currently, water deficit is a grave problem for the municipalities of Sherfadin and Usefa and refugee camps Sherfadin 1 and 2.

Thanks to our donors from the Czech Republic and in cooperation with Barzani Charity Foundation, we distributed parcels with aid to the refugee camps Sherfadin 1 and 2. Each family received a parcel, in total 360 boxes with food and 160 boxes of sanitary articles.

Successful projects in 2016 - Shingala Azad

The German organization Mala Ezidya Oldenburg donated an ambulance car to the Medical Point Sinjar project. The transport of the ambulance from Germany to Kurdistan was taken care of by the Czech humanitarian organization Roja Sor CZ 1, z.s. The ambulance will serve the purposes of the Medical Point.

Project named “Milk for the children where Mom is missing” In cooperation with the German charitable organization Detmold, we managed to deliver aid to children in the Sinjar area from the firm Humanna who has again offered us a very attractive subsidy for their products. Our aid was provided to infants and babies up to two years of age in the mountains of Sinjar where with around 3,000 families live in a refugee camp. We distributed about 5 tons of baby milk and baby food in the four months.

Charita Poland and the Czech organization Roja Sor CZ 1,z.s. sent transport with around 30 tons of humanitarian aid to Iraqi Kurdistan. The organization Shingala Azad NGO took over in the town of Duhok. The aid contained pharmaceuticals, medical material, dental surgery, sanitary articles for adults and children, baby milk, clothes, winter jackets and shoes, blankets, portable beds, school tools, games. This humanitarian aid was distributed in the municipality of Sherfadin, refugee camps Sherfadin 1 and 2 and the villages of Usefa and Rasid.

Diesel for heaters Around 150 families live in the refugee camp Sherfadin 1 and2 in tents; in winter, they face a grave problem – lack of diesel for their heaters. We received funds from our partner – Slovak Catholic Charity – for the purchase of approx. 5,000 litres of diesel.

„The project implemented together with Caritas Slovakia is funded by Official Development Assistance of the Slovak Republic, SlovakAid and partially by Slovakia's Catholic Bishops' Conference.“

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